fullcravings:

Healthy Brownie Granola Bars

fullcravings:

Healthy Brownie Granola Bars

This was posted 2 hours ago. It has 533 notes. .

(Source: lavendel-kjaerlighet, via wrongdecadebabe)

This was posted 6 hours ago. It has 367,726 notes. .

pullinyouunder:

women of mythology - hel

daughter of trickster god loki and a giantess, she is the ruler of helhiem, appointed by odin himself. she is the maiden of death and the underworld. hel.

sad hel, more skeleton then girl, shadow then light, dead then living. she knew that there would be no happiness found for her in asgard, for there she was an anomaly amongst the beautiful and perfect. feared and misunderstood.

she found her place in niflheim, in a castle of ice, cold and snow, surrounded by her subjects. men and women that died without honour, who could not find rest and peace in valhalla.

(via quiddatively)

This was posted 10 hours ago. It has 195 notes.

carryalaser:

Journals, articles, books & texts, on folklore, mythology, occult, and related -to- general anthropology, history, archaeology

Some good and/or interesting (or hokey) ‘examples’ included for most resources.
tryin to organize & share stuff that was floating around onenote.

Journals (open access)
— Folklore, Occult, etc

— History, Archaeology

Journals (limited free/sub/institution access)

Books, Texts, Images etc.
— Folklore, Occult etc.

— History

Websites, Blogs
— Folklore, Occult etc.

— History 

(via quiddatively)

This was posted 14 hours ago. It has 2,351 notes.

We have more Gods and Goddesses than you can shake a stick at. Our Mythology Encyclopedia features over 3,700 weird and wonderful Supreme Beings, Demons, Spirits and Fabulous Beasts from all over the world. Explore ancient legends and folklore, and discover Gods of everything from Fertility to Fluff with Godchecker…

We have more Gods and Goddesses than you can shake a stick at. 

Our Mythology Encyclopedia features over 3,700 weird and wonderful Supreme Beings, Demons, Spirits and Fabulous Beasts from all over the world. Explore ancient legends and folklore, and discover Gods of everything from Fertility to Fluff with Godchecker…

(Source: jenarcherwood, via quiddatively)

This was posted 18 hours ago. It has 618 notes. .

Words to describe someone's voice

  • adenoidal: if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
  • appealing: an appealing look, voice etc shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
  • breathy: with loud breathing noises
  • brittle: if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
  • croaky: if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
  • dead: if someone’s eyes are dead, or if their voice is dead, they feel or show no emotion
  • disembodied: a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat: spoken in a voice that does not go up and down. This word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region.
  • fruity: a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way
  • grating: a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying
  • gravelly: a gravelly voice sounds low and rough
  • gruff: a gruff voice has a rough low sound
  • guttural: a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat
  • high-pitched: a high-pitched voice or sound is very high
  • hoarse: someone who is hoarse or has a hoarse voice speaks in a low rough voice, usually because their throat is sore
  • honeyed: honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice but you cannot trust the person who is speaking
  • husky: a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (=as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way
  • low adjective: a low voice or sound is quiet and difficult to hear
  • low adverb: in a deep voice, or with a deep sound
  • matter-of-fact: used about someone’s behaviour or voice
  • modulated: a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to
  • monotonous: a monotonous sound or voice is boring and unpleasant because it does not change in loudness or become higher or lower
  • nasal: someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose
  • orotund: an orotund voice is loud and clear
  • penetrating: a penetrating voice or sound is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable
  • plummy: a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class. This word shows that you dislike people who speak like this.
  • quietly: in a quiet voice
  • raucous: a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough
  • ringing: a ringing sound or voice is very loud and clear
  • rough: a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to
  • shrill: a shrill noise or voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant
  • silvery: a silvery voice or sound is clear, light, and pleasant
  • singsong: if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way
  • small: a small voice or sound is quiet
  • smoky: a smoky voice or smoky eyes are sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way
  • softly spoken: someone who is softly spoken has a quiet gentle voice
  • sotto voce adjective, adverb: in a very quiet voice
  • stentorian: a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe
  • strangled: a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it
  • strangulated: strangled
  • strident: a strident voice or sound is loud and unpleasant
  • taut: used about something such as a voice or expression that shows someone is nervous or angry
  • thick: if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion
  • thickly: with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat
  • thin: a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to
  • throaty: a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat
  • tight: a tight voice or expression shows that you are nervous or annoyed
  • toneless: a toneless voice does not express any emotion
  • tremulous: if something such as your voice or smile is tremulous, it is not steady, for example because you are afraid or excited
  • wheezy: a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing
  • wobbly: if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry
This was posted 1 day ago. It has 159,403 notes.
machiajelli:

ladynorthstar:

homopiscivore:

mater—tua:

pervygirl:

p33nzine:


Scrotum - The sack that holds the testicles.
Shaft skin- The lowest skin on the penile shaft, that can’t be categorized as foreskin.
Outer mucosa- The outer foreskin. Covers the glans (head of the penis) when flaccid, but this is the portion that remains on the outside of the “skin tube.” Basically this is the same type of skin as regular shaft skin, it’s just located higher up.
Inner mucosa- The inner foreskin. The portion of foreskin that’s inside the “skin tube” when flaccid, and directly contacts the glans. The inner foreskin is highly sensitive, thinner than regular shaft skin, and one of its functions is to protect the glans and keep that more sensitive, too. Circumcision removes a varying degree of inner skin.
Coronal sulcus - Also commonly referred to as just the sulcus. The little groove where the glans and shaft meet.
Glans - The head of the penis. The glans is intended to be covered and kept sensitive by foreskin when flaccid, thus circumcised penises have a glans that is less sexually responsive due to years of exposure.
Frenulum - The strip of skin tethering the glans to the foreskin. Often highly sexually sensitive, but sadly it is often partially or completely removed in circumcision.
Coronal ridge - Also known simply as the corona. The ridge of the glans, that tends to be highly sensitive.
Frenar band - Also known as the ridged band. A highly sensitive bundle of nerves within the inner foreskin, that is unfortunately removed in circumcision.

I had to reblog this. There’s so much to know about cock. Thank you GirlsWatchPorn!

Time to get educated!

INFORMATIVE penis gif. Well there’s a first. o3o


and from this we’ve learnt that if you don’t get circumcision, sex is much more enjoyable…

Yes, altough circumcision in most cases entirely bares the head, which is also sensitive and can make sex a lot better. ouo
I actually just wanted to reblog this to say how happy it makes me when people in fics mention the frenulum.

machiajelli:

ladynorthstar:

homopiscivore:

mater—tua:

pervygirl:

p33nzine:

Scrotum - The sack that holds the testicles.

Shaft skin- The lowest skin on the penile shaft, that can’t be categorized as foreskin.

Outer mucosa- The outer foreskin. Covers the glans (head of the penis) when flaccid, but this is the portion that remains on the outside of the “skin tube.” Basically this is the same type of skin as regular shaft skin, it’s just located higher up.

Inner mucosa- The inner foreskin. The portion of foreskin that’s inside the “skin tube” when flaccid, and directly contacts the glans. The inner foreskin is highly sensitive, thinner than regular shaft skin, and one of its functions is to protect the glans and keep that more sensitive, too. Circumcision removes a varying degree of inner skin.

Coronal sulcus - Also commonly referred to as just the sulcus. The little groove where the glans and shaft meet.

Glans - The head of the penis. The glans is intended to be covered and kept sensitive by foreskin when flaccid, thus circumcised penises have a glans that is less sexually responsive due to years of exposure.

Frenulum - The strip of skin tethering the glans to the foreskin. Often highly sexually sensitive, but sadly it is often partially or completely removed in circumcision.

Coronal ridge - Also known simply as the corona. The ridge of the glans, that tends to be highly sensitive.

Frenar band - Also known as the ridged band. A highly sensitive bundle of nerves within the inner foreskin, that is unfortunately removed in circumcision.

I had to reblog this. There’s so much to know about cock. Thank you GirlsWatchPorn!

Time to get educated!

INFORMATIVE penis gif. Well there’s a first. o3o

and from this we’ve learnt that if you don’t get circumcision, sex is much more enjoyable…

Yes, altough circumcision in most cases entirely bares the head, which is also sensitive and can make sex a lot better. ouo

I actually just wanted to reblog this to say how happy it makes me when people in fics mention the frenulum.

(Source: theprepuce, via neraiutsuze)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 9,169 notes. .

Weekend Links: Writing Dialogue

fictionfiction:

A lot of people assume dialogue is easy to write because ‘It’s just a conversation! I have those all the time.’ 

But real conversations are, for the most part, really boring:

  • Lots of verbal tics (uh, um, like, well, I mean)
  • Lack of conflict (How was your day? Great, yours? Pretty good!) 
  • Cliches and repetitive phrasing 

Writing dialogue that too closely mirrors real conversation will give you lots of repetition on the page. You don’t want that. Repetition is bad. It’s boring. It sucks. It’s totally lame.

All that said, here are a few essential reads re: writing dialogue that is great and awesome.

On Punctuation 

On Saidisms and Dialogue Tags:

On Pacing and Creating Conflict:

On Info-Dumping, Hollywood Narration and As You Know, Bob

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 2,009 notes.

Outline Your Novel In 30 Minutes

writersfriend:

This is a quick exercise designed to sketch out the major events of your novel. It only gives you a map— you have to make the drive yourself!

Get a kitchen timer or set your alarm. You’re going to free-write for three minutes on several questions. (If you want to cheat and write for five minutes on each, go ahead. Just be warned the exercise might take you an hour then.) In free-writing, you put your fingers to keyboard or pen to paper and write, without regard to grammar, spelling, sense, or organization, for a specified period of time. The trick is— you can’t stop till the bell rings. If you can’t think of anything to say, you just write your last word over and over. Pretty quick you’ll get bored and think of something else to write. But remember, turn off the editor. This is exploration, not real writing. 

Type or write the question, then set the clock, read the question allowed, and go. 

Read More

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 5,719 notes.

unreliable/oblivious narrators

bendingsignpost:

flerica answered: I’d like to read more about writing an unreliable or oblivious narrator!

There’s a number of categories for this one. I think of an unreliable narrator as one who misses stuff that’s going on externally (other people’s motives/actions) and an oblivious narrator as one who misses stuff that’s going on internally (their own motives/actions). 

For unreliable narrator (external):

  • they will ignore things that don’t fit into their view 
  • alternatively, they will have some way to fit the fact into their established theory
  • The more attentive your character is, the more your character is going to need to have an established theory. Otherwise, they would become confused and figure out the real deal.
To make sure the audience still gets what’s going on, the things the character is glossing over or rationalizing away should appear in the narrative. They exist outside—or even independently—of the character’s POV. 
For oblivious narrator (internal):
  • simple explanations for own motives (“It was on my way.”)
  • lack of analysis over own reactions or emotions (“I’m pissed off!” with no figuring out why, or an entire scene of close physical contact without them wondering if this should be weird or unusual)

This one is tricky because the character’s lack of self-knowledge will transfer over to the audience. Specific areas of obliviousness are required. Making it too general of a thing would get annoying and confusing very quickly. 

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 39 notes.

amandaonwriting:

Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA) - Resource for Crime Writers

SOURCE

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 168,407 notes.

writeworld:

List of Science Fiction Clichés

"The point is that many of these Clichés are USED in good books, or even movies. The first time, great! The next time, not so great. The hundredth time - it is overused. If you use one of these in a new work, you are guilty of using an idea that has appeared often enough in the past to be an obvious overused cliché."

For more on clichés in Science Fiction writing, see:

For more on clichés from WriteWorld:

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 816 notes.
probendermother:

hawkwardeye:

using the prompts below, write a drabble (or whatever) a day for the next 30 days. find someone willing to hit you if you miss a day. look back at the end and go ‘oh! i’m a writer!’.

beginning. accusation. restless. snowflake. haze. flame. formal. companion. move. silver. prepared. knowledge. denial. wind. order. thanks. look. summer. transformation. tremble. sunset. mad. thousand. outside. winter. diamond. letters. promise. simple. future.


((Starting tomorrow))

probendermother:

hawkwardeye:

using the prompts below, write a drabble (or whatever) a day for the next 30 days. find someone willing to hit you if you miss a day. look back at the end and go ‘oh! i’m a writer!’.

beginning. accusation. restless. snowflake. haze. flame. formal. companion. move. silver. prepared. knowledge. denial. wind. order. thanks. look. summer. transformation. tremble. sunset. mad. thousand. outside. winter. diamond. letters. promise. simple. future.

((Starting tomorrow))

(Source: anarchivedblog)

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 22,142 notes. .
fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Hey guys! Sorry its been so inactive around here. I’m slowly but surely getting finished with my finals.
Anyway, I found this and thought I had to share. The way body language can tell how a person is really feeling is something that I consider very interesting. I think it would be a great way to show, in a subtle way, how a character is really feeing.
Hope its useful! And good luck with finals! Hopefully, this place will be a bit more active once summer kicks in.

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Hey guys! Sorry its been so inactive around here. I’m slowly but surely getting finished with my finals.

Anyway, I found this and thought I had to share. The way body language can tell how a person is really feeling is something that I consider very interesting. I think it would be a great way to show, in a subtle way, how a character is really feeing.

Hope its useful! And good luck with finals! Hopefully, this place will be a bit more active once summer kicks in.

(via sunflowyr)

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 32,131 notes. .

60 Awesome Search Engines for Serious Writers

Finding the information you need as a writer shouldn’t be a chore. Luckily, there are plenty of search engines out there that are designed to help you at any stage of the process, from coming up with great ideas to finding a publisher to get your work into print. Both writers still in college and those on their way to professional success will appreciate this list of useful search applications that are great from making writing a little easier and more efficient.

Professional

Find other writers, publishers and ways to market your work through these searchable databases and search engines.

  1. Litscene: Use this search engine to search through thousands of writers and literary projects, and add your own as well.
  2. Thinkers.net: Get a boost in your creativity with some assistance from this site.
  3. PoeWar: Whether you need help with your career or your writing, this site is full of great searchable articles.
  4. Publisher’s Catalogues: Try out this site to search through the catalogs and names of thousands of publishers.
  5. Edit Red: Through this site you can showcase your own work and search through work by others, as well as find helpful FAQ’s on writing.
  6. Writersdock: Search through this site for help with your writing, find jobs and join other writers in discussions.
  7. PoetrySoup: If you want to find some inspirational poetry, this site is a great resource.
  8. Booksie.com: Here, you can search through a wide range of self-published books.
  9. One Stop Write Shop: Use this tool to search through the writings of hundreds of other amateur writers.
  10. Writer’s Cafe: Check out this online writer’s forum to find and share creative works.
  11. Literary Marketplace: Need to know something about the publishing industry? Use this search tool to find the information you need now.

Writing

These helpful tools will help you along in the writing process.

  1. WriteSearch: This search engine focuses exclusively on sites devoted to reading and writing to deliver its results.
  2. The Burry Man Writers Center: Find a wealth of writing resources on this searchable site.
  3. Writing.com: This fully-featured site makes it possible to find information both fun and serious about the craft of writing.
  4. Purdue OWL: Need a little instruction on your writing? This tool from Purdue University can help.
  5. Writing Forums: Search through these writing forums to find answers to your writing issues.

Research

Try out these tools to get your writing research done in a snap.

  1. Google Scholar: With this specialized search engine from Google, you’ll only get reliable, academic results for your searches.
  2. WorldCat: If you need a book from the library, try out this tool. It’ll search and find the closest location.
  3. Scirus: Find great scientific articles and publications through this search engine.
  4. OpenLibrary: If you don’t have time to run to a brick-and-mortar library, this online tool can still help you find books you can use.
  5. Online Journals Search Engine: Try out this search engine to find free online journal articles.
  6. All Academic: This search engine focuses on returning highly academic, reliable resources.
  7. LOC Ask a Librarian: Search through the questions on this site to find helpful answers about the holdings at the Library of Congress.
  8. Encylcopedia.com: This search engine can help you find basic encyclopedia articles.
  9. Clusty: If you’re searching for a topic to write on, this search engine with clustered results can help get your creative juices flowing.
  10. Intute: Here you’ll find a British search engine that delivers carefully chosen results from academia.
  11. AllExperts: Have a question? Ask the experts on this site or search through the existing answers.

Reference

Need to look up a quote or a fact? These search tools make it simple.

  1. Writer’s Web Search Engine: This search engine is a great place to find reference information on how to write well.
  2. Bloomsbury Magazine Research Centre: You’ll find numerous resources on publications, authors and more through this search engine.
  3. Merriam-Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus: Make sure you’re using words correctly and can come up with alternatives with the help of this tool.
  4. References.net: Find all the reference material you could ever need through this search engine.
  5. Quotes.net: If you need a quote, try searching for one by topic or by author on this site.
  6. Literary Encyclopedia: Look up any famous book or author in this search tool.
  7. Acronym Finder: Not sure what a particular acronym means? Look it up here.
  8. Bartleby: Through Bartleby, you can find a wide range of quotes from famous thinkers, writers and celebrities.
  9. Wikipedia.com: Just about anything and everything you could want to look up is found on this site.
  10. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Find all the great philosophers you could want to reference in this online tool.

Niche Writers

If you’re focusing on writing in a particular niche, these tools can be a big help.

  1. PubGene: Those working in sci-fi or medical writing will appreciate this database of genes, biological terms and organisms.
  2. GoPubMd: You’ll find all kinds of science and medical search results here.
  3. Jayde: Looking for a business? Try out this search tool.
  4. Zibb: No matter what kind of business you need to find out more about, this tool will find the information.
  5. TechWeb: Do a little tech research using this news site and search engine.
  6. Google Trends: Try out this tool to find out what people are talking about.
  7. Godchecker: Doing a little work on ancient gods and goddesses? This tool can help you make sure you have your information straight.
  8. Healia: Find a wide range of health topics and information by using this site.
  9. Sci-Fi Search: Those working on sci-fi can search through relevant sites to make sure their ideas are original.

Books

Find your own work and inspirational tomes from others by using these search engines.

  1. Literature Classics: This search tool makes it easy to find the free and famous books you want to look through.
  2. InLibris: This search engine provides one of the largest directories of literary resources on the web.
  3. SHARP Web: Using this tool, you can search through the information on the history of reading and publishing.
  4. AllReaders: See what kind of reviews books you admire got with this search engine.
  5. BookFinder: No matter what book you’re looking for you’re bound to find it here.
  6. ReadPrint: Search through this site for access to thousands of free books.
  7. Google Book Search: Search through the content of thousands upon thousands of books here, some of which is free to use.
  8. Indie Store Finder: If you want to support the little guy, this tool makes it simple to find an independent bookseller in your neck of the woods.

Blogging

For web writing, these tools can be a big help.

  1. Technorati: This site makes it possible to search through millions of blogs for both larger topics and individual posts.
  2. Google Blog Search: Using this specialized Google search engine, you can search through the content of blogs all over the web.
  3. Domain Search: Looking for a place to start your own blog? This search tool will let you know what’s out there.
  4. OpinMind: Try out this blog search tool to find opinion focused blogs.
  5. IceRocket: Here you’ll find a real-time blog search engine so you’ll get the latest news and posts out there.
  6. PubSub: This search tool scours sites like Twitter and Friendfeed to find the topics people are talking about most every day.

(Source: writingadvice, via quiddatively)

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 54,678 notes.